Tag Archives: Suzi Analogue

Suzi Analogue Doesn’t Want to Be Normal

Suzi Analogue

On the 2010 track “What U Look Like” (tucked in the first third of groundbreaking release NNXTAPE), Miami-based singer, songwriter, and producer Suzi Analogue established a sound and philosophy that hinted at the future of her work. Set to a dizzying instrumental flying by at 160+ BPMs, Analogue’s slick and understated vocal references Gucci purses, Purple Label Ralph Lauren, and a “minimal, modernist/Americana steez.” At first glance, the song scans as a fashion anthem for the contemporary young creative class. But its soaring chorus turns that assumption on its head, revealing a deeper, central theme of connectivity: “I’ve been to many places around the world / Seen the cream of the crop and the haves and the have-nots / We all breathe the same air now.”

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Suzi Analogue Doesn’t Need Your Cosign

Suzi Analog

In 2016, Suzi Analogue moved abruptly to Miami; the cold in New York City was just that tough. “I had a really hard winter,” says the DJ, MC, and producer, born Maya Simone Shipman. “I was going through a lot, as far as anxiety is concerned. I didn’t feel healthy. It was cold, dry air. I was like, ‘You know what? I just need to go. I just need to go and experience something different.’”

The result is Analogue’s new beat tape, ZONEZ V.3, on which she begins to acclimate to her sunny new home. The inspiration for the song “BeachCruiser” was quite literal. “Yup, beach cruising is a thing [in Miami],” she says. “I wanted to tap into the idea of, ‘What does a beach cruiser sound like?’”

Sonically, the track employs darting synths and frenetic, stabbing bass. “This ZONEZ is very New York to Miami,” Analogue says. “I have the island and dance vibes, but then I’m also bringing some more hardcore vibes, inspirations from my nightlife culture in New York [where it’s] cutthroat—the bass has to be banging, the drums have to be hitting. This ZONEZ is a meeting of both of those worlds. I really like that fusion.”

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L.A. Is The Best Place For Devonwho’s Sunny Rap Beats

Devonwho

Devon Fox is Devonwho. Photo by Patti Miller.

Last year, at the age of 31, Devon Fox moved back to Los Angeles after a short stint in San Francisco. For almost a decade, Fox had released hip-hop-leaning electronic music under the name Devonwho, but for a couple years in the Bay Area, he seemed to disappear. “Music wasn’t my main focus for a little while,” he says. “I’m getting back into it and just letting go of the whole perfectionist mindset.”

In the late ’00s, Fox gained traction as a member of Klipmode, a small, loosely-defined collective of producers that also included MNDSGN, Knxwledge, and Suzi Analogue. Launched in 2009 with no fixed homebase, the quartet of Klipmode producers helped calcify the L.A. beat scene’s musical urgency with their varying takes on refreshingly weird hip-hop electronica. The collective put Klipmode’s members on national and international radar. As they all struck out in individual directions, the collective’s structure faded, but the producers still hover around the same scene. Three of the four members—Suzi being the only exception—have released projects on the L.A.-based LEAVING Records, a wide-open stage for off-kilter music co-founded by Brainfeeder producer Matthewdavid.

Fox was the last of the Klipmode alumni to make his LEAVING debut, releasing a cassette EP called Lyon in May, effectively ending his hiatus. A new album called Luz builds upon the EP’s sound and finds Fox breaking his instrumental bent with a pair of vocal tracks. Like Lyon before it, Luz is a dense collection of impeccable electro funk: finicky grooves dripping in distinct, synthesized tones. Fellow Cali producer DâM-FunK is a strong influence on Fox’s G-funk aesthetic. “I kind of know the specific sounds that I’m looking for,” Fox says. “Particularly with this record, I had a sound: very warm, sunny.”

Throughout Luz, Fox pivots between synth leads that warble, bend, and blip. It’s a study in texture, but its producer has an equal knack for rhythm. Even when he pushes his tracks into glitchier territory, Fox still sounds naturally funky. The producer spoke with us about his background as a musician, how his new album came together, and why making music in a cramped studio apartment isn’t the best look.

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